Let’s Talk – Atelier Firis: The Alchemist Of The Mysterious Journey – The Sky’s Our Destination.

Firis is a girl with a dream; to see the world outside of her little hometown. Sadly, her hometown is inside a mountain. And keeps its residents behind a heavy stone door. However, a rather explosive twist of fate helps give her to means to journey beyond the boundaries of her reality, and into the very thing she spent her life fantasizing about.

I am a rather off and on Atelier player. My first exposure to the series, as I’m sure was also many other people’s, was with Atelier Iris on the PS2. I followed up with the second game a little bit later, but never picked up the third one for some reason. Many years later, I would pick up Atelier Ayesha, and while I enjoyed my time with it, the fact that it arbitrarily ended after so long kind of depressed me. Someday, I will probably go back and experience the Atelier games I’ve missed, but today, we are here to discuss Firis’ foray into alchemical hijinks.

One of the stand out things of the Atelier series (sans Iris) is that, usually, you’re given some sort of deadline to accomplish a certain objective, otherwise, you’ll get a pretty lousy ending (the miracle never happen, if you would). Typically, the time given is more than enough, however, to complete the main quest. Fitting everything else in, is a different matter.

You’re given a full year to become a licensed alchemist in Firis, so that she is no longer confined to her small village for the rest of her days. You can reach your destination with over half that time remaining, and passing the exam (abet with a pretty lousy score all things consider) can be brute forced in a way. So the goal is not a challenge, or issue at all.

True to the subtitle, Firis is more about the journey than your overall end goal. What you see, experience, the people you meet and help, the far off edges of your little map. That is the real game behind the facade of an exam. Even after that, you get to go out again, with no time limit, to find what you missed and enjoy everything all out.

The sky, as they say, is the limit here.

The second thing to note, however, is the LP system. Firis isn’t used to travelling, so as she runs around the fields, harvests items and fights enemies, it will go down. Should it reach zero, you’re not completely screwed, as she will take a short rest to recover a small amount to continue on. Let it reach zero again after that, however, and Firis will officially pass out, forcing you back to the previous camp.

It sounds like time limits on time limits, but truthfully, LP should never be an issue.

Campfires are plentiful throughout the world, and stopping at them will let you pull out your pocket atelier (It’s bigger on the inside), to either rest up, customize the Atelier’s furniture (which adds bonuses, gather points, and things that just look nice) or perform everyone’s favorite pasttime, alchemy.

Alchemy is set up like a puzzle this time around. Materials have a set space and color to them, and you arrange them within a grid to get the best results. As you fill the grid in with a color, you’ll get bonus components from that color. In addition, there are lines that bestow various effects, such as increasing item counts, raising quality, or manipulating color levels to help you get the effects you want. It’s a somewhat involved process that I actually kind of enjoy. It looks more like what a real alchemist might do when synthesizing something as opposed to previous games in the series I’ve played where you select an item and I hope you have enough materials or elements to create it.

Atelier Firis ~The Alchemist and the Mysterious Journey~_20170508001047

Results not typical

Speaking of items, the Atelier series is probably one of the few serieses that actually have effective attack items. Considering the whole concept is sort of based around that, I would hope so, but it feels refreshing compared to a whole lot of other RPGs where attack items fall flat in opposed to comparable skills or magic, and end up just becoming pocket change.

The variety is there too. You’ve got bombs, ice bombs, lightning rods, bags full of crab apples, poisons, globes, the list goes on. While skills exist in the Atelier-verse, items are your main source of everything. And typically, there’s an item loadout you can build tailor made to your playstyle… or to make your life against bosses easier (or even feasible). Not that bosses are a major focus in most of the Atelier games. Heck, this game only has one mandatory “boss fight”, and you don’t even have to win it. Everything else is optional.

Combat, however, is kind of weird to really get down in this game. You’ll either breeze through the random enemies, or the random enemies will hand your head to you. There’s rarely a middle ground, and I find that somewhat polarizing. Buffs and debuffs are also rather hit or miss… They hit, but they typically don’t offer enough of an impact to save you nine-out-of-ten times. Exceptions being anything that reduces an enemy’s stats (which may shave off a good 10-20 damage you might take, or increase your damage), statuses that lock down an enemy’s movement, or regen. Everything else either doesn’t work well, or is situational. Which makes those particular items, not worth bringing with you unless you know you’re getting good use out of it. As someone who likes playing around with this type of stuff, I’m a little disappointed.

Or maybe I haven’t played around enough with them yet. That’s also a possibility.

Travelling the areas isn’t typically too time-consuming unless you go around collecting everything (which you do the first time anyway just to keep your supplies up). Firis has a few exploration based items she can synth up to help her out; like a lantern for exploring side caves you’ll find on your journey, a pickaxe for breaking down resilient gather points easier, or my personal favorite, a freaking witch’s broom that lets you glide around at high speed, and even over water. They’re not necessary, but they do contribute to saving time and LP.

Atelier Firis _The Alchemist and the Mysterious Journey__20170529011208.jpg

Wheeee…!

My only complaints about the maps would be somewhat questionable hit detection while walking (how do I get stuck on absolutely nothing?), and that the frame rate drops pretty hard when you stick enough foliage on screen (but every game can be a victim of that). These are minor gripes, however, and the rest of the experience is smooth.

Character (well, party member) interaction is a slight deal here. When you first put a new member into your group (Liane being the exception), they aren’t exactly people that would keep you an address book. As time passes with them in your party, their Friendship goes up, and you’ll start getting little extra side events and quests relating to them. The party members themselves are likable enough. They have a set personality and a quirk or two to add some flavor, but I wouldn’t too expect too much depth out of them. The Friendship stat and doing requests for party members does lead into some of the endings you can get though, so it’s worth doing just to see them (or, you know, you want that sweet virtual platinum trophy).

While I have party members on the mind, I do feel like the games tries to oversell Firis on being “cute”. There are a couple legitimate times where she is, but half the time, it feels like she’s trying to fit in and is just getting made fun of for it. I’m probably reading too much into that though.

On the subject of music, my favorite themes tend to be the battle themes. Particularly the rocking ones. Ones that get me pumped to fight these enemies into the ground. Or play them in a nightclub somewhere…

Atelier as a series gets a different note from me, however. The travelling themes tend to stick out more to me. Firis has more than it’s fair share of music in this regard, each region, environment, and time of day has it’s own track and it’s quite easy to lose yourself in some of them. While I’m mostly likely not going on any grand journeys anytime soon, I’ll definitely be keeping tracks like Together With Transience,  Light Lost In The Trees and Tale Spinning Journey in mind.

Not to say Atelier has bad battle themes. For Firis, I’ve taken a liking to Flying Fast, personally.

I can say that this a solid entry into the Atelier series. I’ll have to go back and play all the other games I missed out on to reach a definitive conclusion of how this stacks up, but I enjoyed my time following the adventures of a young woman discovering the wonders of the world for herself. I feel, though, that Atelier shares a similar state as the Tales series; if you’re going to start playing it, it’s better to start as late as possible. I don’t think Atelier has it quite as bad as Tales, if this sounds like your type of series, starting with Firis is not a bad idea.

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Author: Komoto Raynar

Professionally amateur gamer with a variety of interests

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