Trails of Cold Steel: An Exercise In Tedium

I began my journey into Trails of Cold Steel with high expectations. Lauded by many as one of the strongest JRPG’s on the PS3, I was expecting a grand adventure packed with exciting combat. There was no way this tale of political intrigue and self-discovery could leave me wanting, right?

Right?

The truth is, Trails of Cold Steel is all right. The game does many things that other JRPG’s would never do, like, for example, basing the entire story inside a single nation and primarily focusing on the politics of said nation, with minimal fantasy elements. It is, in many regards, what I had wished Tales of Graces was.

Unfortunately, this story is bogged down with so much backstory and unique terms that it becomes necessary to explain it all to the player for them to even start to comprehend what’s going on. Cutscenes last forever, not because something interesting is happening, but because each new locale or person of interest requires five or ten minutes of dialogue to explain why they’re relevant. And this happens multiple times a chapter, leading to long periods of just watching cutscenes. The only game I can think of that outdoes it in this regard is Xenosaga.

A large part of what slows the story down is the high school setting. The game wants to be Persona and also Tales, to have a central hub area but also feel like a grand adventure for the characters. So you spend half of your time running around Trista and Thors Academy, with the only combat area being an old schoolhouse that doesn’t begin being interesting to the story until the final chapter of the game. The rest is doing menial tasks for people around the school and town. The game would have been much better had it cut the time you spend at Thors in half.

So the game is essentially divided into two parts, a very long and tiring John Hughes film and the actual gameplay. So if most of the movie is boring (we’ll come back to this later), how is the gameplay? Well, it’s… not fun, really.

You can’t say there’s any dissonance between the story and the gameplay because they both drag on for eternity. Enemies appear on the field, and interacting with them sends you to a separate battle screen, a la Star Ocean or Tales. But once you get to that battle screen, you might notice something weird: the combat in general. It plays like a blend between a strategy and an action game, but turn-based. You move your party around the field (or you’re supposed to) and position them to deal the most damage you can to as many enemies as you can. The problems with this are abundant. First of all, there’s a bonus experience system which rewards you for murdering lots of enemies, murdering them quickly, and for murdering them more than they needed to be murdered. So what you’ll really end up doing every battle in order to maximize experience is using your strongest area attacks from the default positions of your characters (which can be arranged within a 4×4 grid within the field menu, but ultimately doesn’t change much) until everything is dead. So you’ll find yourself sticking to fast-acting characters with more brute force attacks, and just using the same one or 2 abilities each turn.

The problem with this is also tied to the story itself. Each chapter is used to send the characters on field studies, splitting the team in half and relegating character usage to only those characters in Rean’s study group. This wouldn’t be such a bad idea, if at some point you actually got to choose who Rean went on field studies with, but you don’t. Even up to Chapter 6 (which is the final field study chapter), the game is deciding who gets to join Rean for you. So sometimes you’ll have to go through entire chapters without any of the characters you actually enjoy using. The only saving grace here is that I can’t recall any chapters that forced both Elliot and Emma into your team, as having two characters designed around spellcasting would have been exhausting.

Spellcasting deserves special mention here. I honestly went through 90% of the game using it as little as possible because of how long it takes. Spells take up two turns, one to begin the casting and the other to actually cast. Now, if they were spaced out normally, this might not be so bad, but spells have “delays” on them which can make the casting time much longer, which is especially noticeable on the higher tier spells (i.e. the ones you’re actually going to care about using). It wasn’t until I got an instant-cast spell called Chrono Burst, which allows you to take two turns without any delay, that I started to use spells more actively, as it allowed instant-casting of these higher tier spells. Before then, it was more worth it to me to just have characters like Elliot use their support abilities and then do regular attacks.

These characters are, however, the main reason to play the game. As boring as the story could be, I was invested in the game because of how these characters were affected by it. It’s heartwarming to see them grow together and develop friendships in a (somewhat) realistic manner. The only one I had any real problem with was Emma, who had hardly any development and was mostly just used to tease an endgame plot twist. She’s mysterious, and the mystery will keep you intrigued… until chapter 5, when said mystery enters the limelight, but by the end is still unexplained. After that, it’s just tedious dealing with, and actively detracts from her character. I understand why they did it, but I don’t agree with that, either.

That reason is that this game is not complete. It was never intended to be a complete experience, in fact. Trails of Cold Steel exists to set up Trails of Cold Steel 2, and that’s it. The game itself is aware of this, introducing a whole new gameplay style during the final boss, of all things, as well having the last hour of the game be the climax that leads into Cold Steel 2.

Now, all of this would have made for a mediocre RPG experience. On its own, Trails of Cold Steel is nothing special. However, there are technical limitations that drag it down even further. First of all, because the game was developed simultaneously for both the Playstation 3 and Vita, corners were cut in multiple places. Voice acting will start and stop throughout cutscenes, with the main character Rean having almost no speaking lines in the high school scenes (about half of the game). About half the nation of Erebonia is never shown, including one half of the capital city you visit midway through the game, because they couldn’t fit it onto a Vita card. Roads exist that connect the various towns with each other, but you’re not allowed to use them, with the flimsy explanation being that the party’s field studies aren’t allowed to take them beyond a certain point.

Worse than this, however, is the strain Trails of Cold Steel puts on the Playstation. Crashes were so frequent and so regular that I began to think there was a problem with my Playstation 3 (after playing other games without any crashes at all, this is not the case). And ultimately, one crash in the final hour of the game forced a system format, wiping my Playstation of all saves, including the 74 hours I’d put into this draining mess of a game. It’s unlikely I’ll ever pick it up again, at least not by myself. It was a depressing end to my experience, but also, I think, a fitting one.

Ultimately, I cannot recommend Trails of Cold Steel. There is a diamond buried in here, for sure, but it’s obscured by mounds of garbage. It’s a tedious game, filled with busywork to display an illusion of activity. It’s an RPG without the sense of adventure that the genre is built upon. The development itself is shoddy. I desperately wanted to like Trails of Cold Steel, but it constantly lowered my expectations.

4/10

Format: Playstation 3

Developer: Nihon Falcom

Publisher: Xseed Games

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A Look At Master of None and the Season Finale

Warning: Spoilers abound. Read at own discretion.

A few months ago, near the start of the year, I binged both seasons of Master of None, up until a certain point. The penultimate episode left me broken and terrified of what the final episode would look like. I laid down on my bed and had a soft cry, then did nothing for hours until I had to go to work, which I only did begrudgingly. After that, I didn’t glance at the show for months.

That episode resonated with me, and continues to do so, thanks to the similarities between my life and Dev’s. Specifically, the unrequited romance with a friend that you aren’t sure how to approach, but spending time with them still just makes you happy, even as it hurts to leave their company. I’ve found myself in a similar situation for the entirety of this year, and so seeing that reenacted so realistically and beautifully on my screen strikes a chord that stings my soul. And so, I removed myself for fear of the final episode just completely trashing me.

Yesterday, I renewed my Netflix subscription after not having it for months, and the first thing I did was finish Master of None. It did trash me, as I expected, but not in the way I expected. Honestly, the finale left me confused as to what emotions I should be holding. Joy? Sadness? Hope? I’m not sure. And a lot of this confusion comes down to the very last scenes of the episode.

Most of the finale plays out exactly how I predicted. In the wake of Dev admitting his feelings to Francesca (who has a fiancee, creating the conflict) in the previous episode, she understandably tells him it can’t work between them. At the same time, however, she toys with the idea, sharing a romantic evening and even a passionate kiss with Dev, before turning him down. Dev feels used, she’s offended by him accusing her of using him, and they leave on bad terms, with Dev trying to figure out how to cope with the fallout.

And then the final scenes. Dev is alone in his apartment, moping over the “loss” of Francesca. Francesca is preparing to go back to Italy, but once she’s finished, watches a video on her phone she and Dev had taken a few days prior, wherein they tell their future selves that they hope they’re happy, wherever they are. Her fiancee walks into the room right after it ends and asks her if she’s packed and ready to go. Francesca replies, “I hope so.” Cut to the next morning with Francesca and Dev in bed together, starting to wake up, and the episode ends.

This is what I’m not sure about. Being in a similar situation, this fills me with hope, reassuring me that maybe, someday, I can be with the woman I love. But beyond that, removing my personal experiences from the equation, the ending seems very fantasist. It feels like a happy ending inserted because they couldn’t end the season on the downer note of Dev’s personal and professional lives in the gutter, rather than one he earned. Because in real life, people don’t leave their fiancees and move to a city across the world for someone they haven’t even started a romantic relationship with yet. That’s just not realistic, and conflicts with the tone of the show.

And then my mind drew a comparison to The Graduate. At the end of The Graduate, Ben crashes Elaine’s wedding, and she elopes with him, after already having said her vows. They catch a bus and sit at the very back, where they look joyful and happy. But the camera lingers. As you see them sitting there, their joyful expressions turn to ones of doubt and concern, a feeling made even more palpable by the lack of dialogue, as they cannot even express these feelings with each other. They made a decision based on their feelings, and are now realizing that the consequences of that decision will be long-lasting and perhaps very negative.

The ending to Master of None’s 2nd season is very similar to this, except it leaves out the last part. It doesn’t show us how Dev and Francesca are feeling. Neither of them are awake in the final scene, allowing us no insight into their minds. The show explains the decision, but not the thoughts afterwards. It leaves me wanting. It leaves me confused.

Horizon and a Short Look at DLC

With the last console generation, there were certain practices in the game industry that were introduced which never could have been conceived in a prior generation. The most prevalent of these, however, was the introduction of DLC as a way of expanding the game experience.

When it was first introduced, DLC was mostly a way to add a little more story content to a game or add in a larger variety of locales in multiplayer games, but it would eventually spiral into the mess we have today, where you have to buy costumes in a Tales game or- and this is a real thing- see through girl’s clothing in Gal Gun. Eventually, this would escalate into microtransactions, a concept from Free-To-Play games that has been blighting the AAA industry for about two years now, always in disgusting, slimy fashion.

However, there is yet hope! Certain games have taken DLC in an entirely different direction. Rather than forcing you to purchase things which should have been in the game from the beginning, or pervy gross wank-mechanics, Games like The Witcher 3 have, in the past, shown that DLC could be utilized more in the fashion of an MMO’s expansion pack, wherein you add in entirely new storylines that build on an existing, complete experience. And the latest to do so is Guerrilla Games’ Horizon: Zero Dawn.

When Horizon came out earlier this year, I was enthralled with it. The combat is tense, often chaotic fun, the story was gripping and well-told, with numerous interesting characters to meet and intriguing cultures to interact with, and the world was visually stunning. Unlike most other open-world games, Horizon didn’t feel the need to fill the world with pointless collectables, instead creating a limited number that they used to create unique gaming experiences, build further on their world, and even gave them a practical use if you know where to look. It wasn’t excessively long, clocking in at 55 hours for my first completion, and after I was done, I still wanted to keep playing.

Well, come November 7th, I might have reason to. Horizon: Zero Dawn will be getting an expansion, and this makes me so excited, not just for Horizon, but for games as a whole. The expansion is meant to include an entire new area, a host of new enemies to fight, a whole culture we have yet to interact with for any significant amount of time (the Banuk, which had one small settlement you could visit in the base game, but nothing beyond that), as well as continuing the story that ended so phenomenally, but still left room for more. Guerrila Games basically took what could have been the premise for a whole sequel, and are adding it to the existing game for a third of the price.

This excites me. This is what I have wanted DLC to be for so long, the only way I could ever truly be made to embrace the concept, even. One of the most scummy businessmen in the industry, EA’s John Riccitiello, once said this: “A few years ago, the game you bought is the game you got.” He portrayed this in a negative light, but for many, myself included, we look back on the pre-PS3 era as a time when we bought a game and played the game without the game ever trying to sell us costumes or gun packs or (god-forbid) ammo packs. We bought a game and it was complete.

I bought Horizon: Zero Dawn and it was complete. I do not have to wait 3 years and pay $60 for a sequel to this game. This is the marrying of two things which should have gotten together ages ago, but the sheer bliss I feel in seeing them now is still incomparable. This is how DLC should be done. This is how it needs to be going forward. Games industry, look to Horizon‘s example and learn from it.

Tales of Berseria: The Greatest Tales Ever Told

When Tales of Zestiria came out, I absolutely fell in love with the story and characters, even if the gameplay itself was obtuse, unnecessarily difficult, and downright frustrating. Regardless, I immediately claimed it as my favorite Tales game, even if so many others are technically superior in all aspects. Zestiria garnered a special place in my heart that cannot be taken by any other. One came close, however: it’s immediate successor, Tales of Berseria.

Being a prequel to Zestiria, the games are similar in many ways, some good and others… not so much. As a result, this review will actually feature both in about equal measure. But while on the surface level, Berseria might share many similarities with Zestiria, once you graze beneath the surface, you start to see just how much improved in Berseria.

For one, the story is immensely better. Zestiria was a classic Good Vs. Evil story, “Like a bad play where the heroes are right, and nobody thinks or expects too much.” Blues Traveler’s words are very fitting for Zestiria, and it is a damning statement. Even if I personally found the world and story of Zestiria gripping, it’s easy to spot the numerous cliches. Sorey and friends are set on a journey to “save the world” from the ruin you don’t often actually see outside of cutscenes. The beautiful world sat in stark contrast to the terrified way people spoke of it. Not so in Berseria, where many areas of the world are clearly in states of decay. The world of Berseria is teetering on a ledge between doom and salvation, and even salvation would be doom. Where in Zestiria, the villain was a stock standard Stoic Evil Behemoth of a Man who had barely any presence in the story itself and a backstory that the game literally told you in a thirty second cutscene with no dialogue (it’s built on for about 5 minutes at the VERY end of the game), in Berseria, the bad guy is a Villain With Good Publicity such as Tales is known for, who genuinely wants the best for the world but was broken by his own experiences into utilizing methods that would make his goal ultimately meaningless. He is constantly in the background of the story, even if not directly involved in whatever current situation the party is dealing with.

One of Berseria’s big selling points was the first female protagonist in franchise history (not including Milla Maxwell of Xilia, who shared the position with Jude Mathis). Velvet Crowe is arguably one of the strongest characters in the Tales series, with writing that develops her well over the course of the story and a performance by Cristina Valenzuela that sells every moment. The prologue begins with her as a happy, cheerful girl who’s friends with the whole village and cares for her family deeply. After three hours, she is a broken, vengeance-fueled demon (quite literally) with the blood of the entire village wet on her hands. She is beholden to no such lofty goals like “saving the world” or “helping my friends” when she begins her journey. She wants only to kill the man who destroyed her world. At one point, one character refers to the party as a “troupe of villains,” and this indeed holds true to the very end of the game, as even though they ultimately “saved the world,” Velvet’s legacy is as the first “Lord of Calamity,” a term players of Zestiria will recognize immediately.

All the characters in the game are actually very well-written, especially on the party’s side. Rokurou Rangetsu is a demon who joins the party early on, claiming a debt to Velvet that beholdens him to her cause. He lives for the thirst for battle and aims to kill his brother for reasons he’s not immediately willing to share. Eizen (a returning character from Zestiria) is a pirate who joins the party searching for the captain of his crew. He is cold and ruthless (or so he likes to think). Laphicet is a malakim with, initially, no personality of his own, who joins the party due to an attachment he feels for Velvet. He’s also a Zestiria returner, though you might be surprised by who he is. Magilou is a witch who doesn’t care about the party at all and only travels with them because she finds it fun. She is an entirely mysterious character you learn little about, but is an absolute delight to have on your screen. Finally, Eleanor is a praetor for the villainous Abbey, who finds herself attached to the party after they’re forced to work together to survive. Aside from Velvet, Eleanor is probably the character who grows the most over the course of the story, and I found myself just as invested in her arc as I was in Velvet’s.

The most palpable improvements to Berseria were made to the combat system, however. Gone is Zestiria’s awkward Fire Emblem-esque weapon triangle, replaced instead by… nothing. Because it was unnecessary. The equipment system is far less obtuse, as well. Instead of a confusing mess where you had to combine items with abilities in specific slots in order to transfer them or mix two abilities to create an entirely new one (seriously, 60% of my frustration in Zestiria came from that), it has a more Graces-esque style of just using items to level the gear and unlock set abilities on the gear. It’s far more stream-lined and easy to grasp and I love it.

When it came to level and monster design, however, I have to call Berseria out for it’s laziness. Several locales are just retooled Zestiria locations (one particular early meadowy area I immediately recognized as a swamp from Zestiria, for example), and many trees, buildings, and such look exactly the same. Monsters were even worse about it, with probably about 50% of the bestiary being ripped from the game’s predecessor. And yes, the dreaded Marmot made a return (incidentally, being the spark that made me realize what was happening). Although, given that the game had a production cycle of about a year, I am willing to forgive this, while still acknowledging it happened.

However, character design is extraordinarily hit and miss, as well. Characters like Eizen and Laphicet have very memorable and sensible designs that clearly define who they are, others like Velvet and Magilou are far from sensible. Magilous’ “book skirt,” in p[articular, has become an endless fount of comedy for detractors of the characters, and I have to say… the book skirt is awful. I bought some of the DLC costumes just to get rid of it. Meanwhile, Rokurou wins the award for Least Visually Interesting Design In A Tales Game Since Genis From Symphonia. He’s a samurai. He wears purple samurai clothes. How cool.

Speaking of the DLC, however, this has become a major point of contention for me when playing recent Tales games. Zestiria made a handful of costumes DLC, which worried me then, but Berseria has taken the idea and ran with it. Gone are the days of cool sidequests where you might be rewarded with a nifty bartender outfit for Guy or even an epic black and red palette swap for Sorey. If you don’t unlock a costume via the story in Berseria, it’s DLC. Period. And there is SO MUCH DLC. They clearly had a lot of interesting ideas for cool outfits for all the different characters, but having to pay for them just feels gross. It’s a business practice in games that I’m becoming more and more disgusted with, where you take things that would have otherwise been in the base game, and force people to pay for it.

Ultimately, Berseria is a great game and you can’t go wrong picking this one up. It’s easily a contender for the best game in the series, and I personally would place it at the top. However, I cannot move past the hostage-taking of costumes, and I would like if, for the next entry, they made entirely new assets. Zestiria and Berseria taking place in the same world a mere few hundred years apart allows it some leeway, but going forward I would like to see both of these practices disappear.

Developer: Bandai Namco

Console: Playstation 4

Genre: Japanese RPG

Final Score: 8

Fire Emblem Awakening’s Greatest Flaw

In the late 2000’s and early ’10’s, Intelligent Systems knew one thing for sure: Fire Emblem, their series of strategy RPG’s with a respectable twelve mainstay entries, was dying. New entries were no longer garnering the attention they once did, and remakes such as Shadow Dragon went out practically unnoticed. By 2012, Intelligent Systems was ready to call it quits.

They had spent a couple of years sure in this knowledge, in fact, and had thrown everything into one last project, a swan song for the Fire Emblem franchise they had been building on since 1990. It would be their biggest project yet, with more characters than anybody knew what to do with and nigh-unlimited supports to go with them. The game would incorporate facets from older entries as well, such as the marriage and child mechanics from Genealogy of the Holy War and the overworld map and “random” battles of Sacred Stones and Gaiden. Everything was set into place for Fire Emblem to go out with a big bang, Final Fantasy-style.

And indeed, it did go the way of Final Fantasy. Just like Square’s 1987 RPG epic, Fire Emblem Awakening blew up, gaining audiences Intelligent System had never thought they would be courting. There were a few major reasons for this. First and foremost was the introduction of a “Casual” gameplay mode. This allowed players to go through a map and make minor mistakes without any permanent character losses. This is often disavowed as making the game “too easy,” and while, yes, it does simplify the game a lot, it only really makes the game better for those who want to use it. In previous entries, if a character died, and you wanted to continue using them, you had to restart the map constantly until you ran it in a way where nobody died. You could easily spend 3-4 hours (if you’re as terrible at these games as I am) resetting a map to run it the one perfect way. In casual mode, there’s no need for that. If one character dies, sure, you no longer have access to them for this match, but they’ll rejoin you for the next, and if you’re like me and want to preserve every character, this setting can only be a boon. (I want to point out that, according to what I’ve heard, Heroes Of Light and Shadow, the game before, actually introduced the “Casual” mode concept. But as that is a Japan exclusive title, Awakening may as well have been the first -Ray)

The next major factor is how prettied up the game became. Previous Fire Emblem‘s had an art style with more realistic proportions. People were usually still pretty, but in a normal sort of way. Awakening went full anime. Every single character is gorgeous or handsome or at least good-looking. There’s no Bartre’s or Gonzalez’s in Awakening, is what I’m saying. This actually ties into the third major factor and the one I want to spend the most time discussing: supports.

Supports have been around since 1994’s Mystery of the Emblem, though they wouldn’t take the form we know until the first GameBoy Advance title, The Binding Blade. Essentially, when the characters fight near each other, they can build bonds which can, in turn, lead to skits which provide character development and will, afterwards, allow those units to fight with each other even more effectively. For the sake of game balance, previous entries relegated you to 5 supports per character per playthrough, which meant to see them all you would have to play the game multiple times, and focus on different characters every time. Awakening removed this stipulation for the sake of the marriage and children game mechanic, with… interesting results.

In Awakening, a big part of the story (even though only one character from this facet of the story is ever forced on your party) is that, in the future, the first generation characters are all killed by the Big Bad, and the second generation characters, their children, go back in time to attempt to avert that from happening. But for those characters to appear, they must first exist, which means some soldiers gotta get some bedsheets rockin’. That’s where the supports come in. All the children (save the plot relevant one and the Avatar’s, as the Avatar can be of either gender) are attached to a mother, so when a mother marries any eligible husband, their child will appear on the map. To get them married, you have to support.

Supporting can be a daunting task, however. With few exceptions, a character of one gender can support and marry with just about any character of the opposite gender, as a way to ensure that most everybody can get married and you won’t lose out on any children. They can then also support with about 4-5 characters of the same gender, building strong bonds of friendship to utilize on the battlefield. As well, every character can support with the Avatar, and the Avatar can support with every character.

The second half of that last sentence probably seems redundant, right? Well, it is, but it also isn’t. There is a separate connotation implied when I say “the Avatar can support with every character.” But what could that connotation possibly be, Wombat?! Well, I’ll tell you, because it’s what I’ve been leading up to this entire time: there are characters that ONLY the Avatar can support with.

In fact, every character who joins after Henry’s addition in Chapter 13 has no supports with any first generation character except the Avatar and, in the case of second generation characters, their parents. This includes the plot important Say’ri, Flavia, and Basilio, as well as side mission recruits Tiki (who is actually a returning character from the very first Fire Emblem) and Anna, and extends to SpotPass characters such as Walhart, Aversa, Gangrel, and Emmeryn, some of whom actually have deeply personal connections with other first generation characters, but regardless can only support with the Avatar. This is especially egregious with Say’ri (who shares a national background with Lon’qu, being the only citizens of Chon’sin), Tiki (who, as a thousand plus year old manakete, shares much in common with Nowi, the main manakete of Awakening), and Emmeryn (who is the main character Chrom’s and first cleric of the game Lissa’s sister), all of whom should reasonably support outside of the Avatar but don’t.

Now, some would say that supports are not actually that integral to the gameplay, and there is an argument to be made there, an argument which fire I would fan being on the opposing side. As previously addressed, supports give a boost in stats when two supported units fight near each other. This is actually amplified in Awakening with the major new gameplay mechanic introduced in the game, Pair Up. With Pair Up, two units can occupy one space and fight together as one. Pair Up could be the topic of an article all its own, what with its controversial nature, but there is no denying that it is THE driving force behind Awakening’s gameplay. Now, how does Pair Up tie into my complaint about the Avatar’s support exclusivity? It’s quite simple, really.

All those characters who can only support with the Avatar? You know, the ones you fought tooth and nail in some of the hardest maps in the entire game to acquire and add to your available roster? Well, at best, you might be able to utilize about three or four (I named nine earlier, and only touched on a little more than half the available exclusive units) of them on any given map, and that’s if you have them all stay right next to the Avatar. This is because if a character can not effectively Pair Up with other units, you are essentially handicapping yourself by using them, and the Avatar, like all other units, can only Pair Up with one character at a time. They can still lend out their support stat bonuses to nearby allies, but will not be able to join in for Pair Up abilities. This means that, for the most part, these late game units will be receiving very little use due to their lack of variety. If you can only keep them near the Avatar, why use them at all when their slot could be taken by another unit who can Pair Up with over half the army?

The answer is, you shouldn’t.

Fire Emblem Awakening is a great game, and is indeed the reason I started to play not only the Fire Emblem series as a whole, but also began to give the entirety of the strategy RPG genre a chance. It has numerous flaws, some of which we touched upon here, but overall, it’s a glowing masterpiece that stands as one of the best of its kind (even if hardcore Fire Emblem fans hate it, this “waifu-simulator” has more than proven itself), and it really is just this one major issue that truly bothers me whenever I discuss the game with others. The game is built around supports and its strong character interactions, but all the characters in the second half of the game lose out on those strengths and appear shallow, pointless, and misused as a result. Even worse, characters who should have become game breakers are instead bench warmers, all because they cannot make appropriate use of one of the game’s major mechanics. It’s just sad to think about what could have been. But, in the end, Fire Emblem Awakening is still a great game. Go play it so you can nitpick as much as I do.

Just don’t play Fates. At all. Go get Shadows of Valentia.

 

(Edit: Some of these have since changed and more supports are available, but it was not that way for a long time. As well, their S-rank [marriage] supports are still limited to the Avatar.)

Understanding Where I’m At

The reason I’m writing this is because I really don’t know. Everything in my life feels as if it’s crumbling around me, and I’m desperately clutching to catch any pieces I can, only to discover that none of the pieces are tangible. They pass right through my outstretched hands as if they were holograms, displayed by some needlessly cruel puppet master, toying with his favorite victim.

My pain largely starts at the professional level. I spend more of my waking week at work than I do at home, or at least it feels as if I do. There is definitely not enough time in my day for any sort of social life, that’s for sure. And normally, that would be upsetting, but not crushing. However, most of the pressure of the store is being placed on my shoulders, as my boss is incredibly lazy and the other shift managers are either largely absent or incompetent. Sometimes they’re both at once. Compounded with the fact that, despite being a shift manager, I don’t actually get paid anymore than a regular staff member, and the fact that the store is steadily losing employees, whenever at work I am simply overwhelmed by everything going on around me. Principles alone allow me to struggle through each day, as I refuse to sacrifice work ethic to my stress overlord.

As we climb down from work, we reach my transportation situation. A couple of months ago, my car broke down outside of a post office. Due to the previously mentioned busy work life, I wasn’t able to go back to it for about five days, at which point it had been towed and kept in the towing company’s lot for four of those days. They were asking for $500 to get the car out of their lot, which would have left me with absolutely zero money to attempt to fix the car that already had several crippling issues, much less any cash to eat or pay bills. So I had to leave that car behind, and I was without transportation of my own for those two months. I had to rely on others, something I despise doing and which crushes my pride every time I do. But finally, this week, I bought a car of my own! No longer was I reliant on others, no longer did I have to schedule my life strangely to account for others’ schedules! That was, until, the car blew a tire on my way in to work today. There is no donut in my car to easily attach and continue going for a short period of time, either. Not only that, but as I attempted to remove the tire today I discovered that one bolt had been stripped nearly completely, making it impossible to remove via conventional methods (i.e. the only methods I know). So now, I do not even have the transportation I just purchased.

Next, my future living situation is a constant flip-flop. Currently, I live in a cheap apartment where I don’t have central air conditioning (I have a wall unit, which just does not reach the bedroom, and in Texas weather, that’s basically death) and where I’m constantly battling pest infestation. Even after a month of near-constant spraying, they have not completely disappeared. I was meant to move elsewhere with my ex-girlfriend a few months ago, but I believe the “ex-” prefix precludes that sad conclusion. Afterwards, I was meant to room with my best friend (that isn’t Raynar), but due to loss of my car they felt uncomfortable with my moving in and that future was nixed as well, possibly forever. Which leaves me living alone (and I don’t cope well with loneliness) and in an environment that only frustrates and upsets me.

Finally (and this is something that I’m terrified of talking about anywhere, but I know if I don’t get it out, I’ll just implode in a tangled mass of feelings), I’m consumed by my feelings for another person. Said other person has circumstances that make it impossible to address these feelings with them, but I feel like unless I do, I can’t move on. But that’s not fair to them, to subject them to my selfish feelings just because I have them. I’m just trapped in this cycle of liking them but unable to tell them that I do, but also unable to just drop the feelings and move on. It’s like my heart is caught in a vice grip, and either way I move can only lead to it being ripped open, and therefore I am forced to suffer in silence so as to not hurt others.

All of this while I’m trying to write, both a short story and the (supposedly) regular video game reviews, leaves me with no creative energy or motivation. There are things that I would like to do with my life, but circumstances only depress me and leave me incapable of doing anyrthing but half-heartedly playing video games and watching Netflix (which, incidentally, Master of None is what upset so much that I had to write this right after seeing a certain episode. Watch that show). I don’t know how to progress from this point, but this is where I’m at, and where I’m stuck for the time being.

Was Grunge Good? (A Response)

(A Response to an Article of the same name by NewRepublic.com)

As with all forms of media, there is no true answer to this question. Quality is subjective to the consumer and therefore, while it might be that I hold grunge to an esteemed position within my heart (except for Pearl Jam), it might be that someone else would listen to it and feel nothing but disgust and disdain (hello Mother).

It is, quite frankly, completely silly to ask after the quality of an entire genre of work, as well. There are good grunge artists (such as Soundgarden and Nirvana) just as there are terrible grunge artists (like Pearl Jam). And even then, the quality of their albums may differ, such as how Nirvana’s Bleach sounds like a drippy fart in a kindergarten class (except “Love Buzz” and “About A Girl”, I love those songs), or how Pearl Jam somehow stumbled across decent songwriting with about half of Ten. And that parenthetical statement in the previous sentence is evidence as well that a bad muffin can still have some tasty blueberries within.

Normally, I might spend more time delving into theoretical discussion, but I feel that the shared name of our articles is a dull-witted question asked only by those without enough critical thought to understand that for each person on this planet, there is an entire world, and in some of those worlds, grunge may be good, and in others, grunge may be bad. Still to others, grunge may have never entered their vocabulary.

And to your assertation that “to have much feeling for Cornell, who also fronted the groups Temple of the Dog and Audioslave, it would appear that you had to have lived in a certain era at a certain age,” I would like to point out that Chris Cornell had a solo career that, while never incredibly popular, still flourished, and that younger people are still being introduced to his work, and appreciating it, even today. Grunge is a product of the 90’s, there’s no doubt about that (well, except for all the bands and albums formed and released in the late 80’s, but I guess we’ll pretend those don’t exist), but it is not a product trapped in the 90’s. It still resonates with people today the same way it did back when you were listening to it.

Personally, grunge was my gateway to the larger music scene as a whole, with Nirvana’s Nevermind being the first album I ever bought. It’s not my favorite musical genre, nor does it house all of my favorite bands (Nirvana is still my favorite band, but most others are post-grunge or 60’s/70’s rock), but it is still a good genre to me.

And while I realize that you did not make any definitive, “objective” statements on the matter in your article (which actually further destroys the purpose of your title), the title still implies that there could be answer. There is not. If anybody wishes to find an answer to the question “Was Grunge Good?”, I would strongly recommend going and listening to some grunge yourself to find out what your answer is.

 

 

 

But not Pearl Jam, they suck.